Quote By the French Writer Fougeret de Monbron about the English

Louis-Charles Fougeret de Monbron was an 18th-century French writer. Among his works was the anti-British pamphlet Préservatif contre l’anglomanie (1757). He made the following statement:

“We are the only nation in the universe that the English do not despise. They rather do us the honor of hating us with all the heartiness possible. Their aversion against us is a sentiment with which they are inculcated from the cradle. Before they know that there is a God to worship, they know that there are Frenchmen to be detested.”

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A Frenchman must always talking – A Quote by Samuel Johnson

In a quote the famous English writer Samuel Johnson (1709-84) – who was often referred to as Dr. Johnson – summed up his view on the difference between a Frenchman and an Englishman:

“A Frenchman must be always talking, whether he knows anything of the matter or not; an Englishman is content to say nothing when he has nothing to say.”

Source

Clarke, Stephen. 1000 Years of Annoying the French. London: Black Swan, 2010.

Something to Think about – A Quote by Kurt Tucholsky

The German-Jewish journalist and writer Kurt Tucholsky (1890-1935) once tried to point out the differences between the English, French and Germans by stating as follows:

“People in England want something to read, the French something to taste, and the Germans something to think about.”

Source

Watson, Peter. The German Genius: Europe’s Third Renaissance, the Second Scientific Revolution, and the Twentieth Century. London: Simon & Schuster, 2010. 

The American as the Englishman Left to Himself – Famous Quotes

Since this blog often deals with issues concerning the Anglosphere, it is worth quoting Alexis de Tocqueville. In the 19th century he famously stated:

It is true that each people has a special character independent of its political interest. One might say that America gives the most perfect picture, for good or ill, of the special character of the English race. The American is the Englishman left to himself.

This quote is taken from Daniel Hannan’s book How We Invented Freedom & Why It Matters (London: Head of Zeus, 2013).